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Some Awesome Aussie GPX 6000 Finds

Some Awesome Aussie GPX 6000 Finds

* Some Awesome Aussie GPX 6000 Finds *

The Minelab GPX 6000 Pulse-Induction detector has now been available in Australia for about 2 years. In that time some awesome nuggets have been unearthed throughout Australia. Some of these significant finds have been publicised, and not surprisingly, many fantastic finds have not been publicised for various reasons.

Several big chunks of gold have been recently found in Western Australia.

 

Below are some of the Minelab GPX 6000 finds that have been shared online:

The big nugget shown in the two photos above reportedly weighs  about 13 Ounces  (about 0.4 kg).  My "guesstimation" is that the total weight of all of the above nuggets would be  at least 30 Ounces !

 

Below are some more finds using the GPX 6000:

“Here are two of the nicest bits for the season, biggest is 5.5 oz (171.2g) and the other is just over an ounce (35.5g). Both found with a 6000 while pushing. Interestingly the big bit was laying flat, in a crevice in a rock bar, about 60 cm down I suppose (from the bottom of the push) but it was not an inverted signal, and I have no idea why.

Every other solid bit I've got from a gram or so up has been an inverted signal. It started off as a normal up down signal, sounded very OK like a few gram specie 10 inches or so down, good but not outstanding. It just got louder and louder the deeper I got. By about 40-50 cm down I knew it was going to be a better bit, maybe an ounce or two even, and I was convinced that it had to be a specie as the signal wasn't inverted.

The pinpointer was going crazy over a red rock stuck in the crack and I couldn't see any gold yet so I was convinced it was under the rock, got the biggest shock when I got that rock out and felt the weight. It was flat and heavy and clearly a nugget but even after giving it a wash I still couldn't see any gold.

Took a couple of days in alibright for the red coating to dissolve. It has about 6 g of rock in it based on an SG test so it's technically a specie but I'm happy to call it a nugget. The smaller bit was in a different spot, in old wash, probably 70 cm or so down from the surface. I had pushed it though so I only had to dig a few inches. Before I dug it I tried detecting it from the surface level and got no response. Had to be down another 6 inches or so before any signal but it was inverted all the way. The bit was in a small crack but standing upright on it's side and it looked bright and shiny like it does now when it was still stuck in the hole.”

 

 

 

An old Aussie gold prospector (who has used all of Minelab’s other pulse-induction detectors over the past decade (e.g. SDC 2300, GPX 5000 & GPZ 7000) has also used the GPX 6000 in Western Australia for 118 days (about 1,000hrs of swinging) and on 100 of those days, his GPX 6000 detected 854 gold nuggets in highly mineralised ground. He mostly used the large Minelab GPX17x13” elliptical Mono coil for excellent ground coverage (“patch hunting”) and depth capability. In fact, the GPX17 coil easily detected two spherical-shaped nuggets (a 5-grammer, and a 6 grammer) at depths of between 40cm and 45cm in highly mineralised ground north of Kalgoorlie. The GPX17 coil also picks up the small bits too – using the proven “Low & Slow” technique. He also found the GPX14 DD coil excellent for use in salty/conductive ground (where it was almost impossible to run a Mono coil), as well as in areas within/nearby high electromagnetic interference (EMI).

 

 

Liz Pickthall spends her spare time detecting in the central goldfields of Victoria.

"I finally had seen and heard enough, and at the age of 28 I decided to go out and invest in my first detector. Only then did I realise my true love for it, and I’ve been addicted ever since. As the years went by and my love for detecting grew, I started to work less and detect more.

After upgrading my metal detector to the GPX 6000, I was keen to upgrade my coil as well. I waited for the release of all brands of coils, and was lucky enough to be able to try before I bought two different coils – one of which was the Coiltek 9” GOLDHAWK.

It didn’t take me long to see that it was the standout performer in all areas including weight and sensitivity – and it worked wonders on all ground types in the Victorian goldfields. I was so impressed by how quiet it ran for such a sensitive coil. The 9” coil has found gold in the most ‘flogged out’ areas, with the coil’s size making it so easy to get in tight areas under and around bushes and trees.”

 

 

 

 

  

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

Imagine how many tens-of-thousands of gold nuggets (& specimens) have been found throughout Australia over only the past 2 years using the mighty Minelab GPX 6000 detector.

Imagine how many more huge chunks of gold are still out there throughout Australia - that have never had a GPX 6000 scan over them !

To boot ..... there are now  SEVEN  (7)  different coils available for the GPX 6000.  Even better - four of these new coils are AUSSIE-MADE.

Coupled with a super-low 1.225 kHz operating frequency of the GPX 6000 - it's no wonder the GPX 6000 is a gold magnet !     (By comparison the GPX 5000 "is configured to operate at a fundamental operating frequency of 5 kHz", and the GPZ 7000 "is configured to operate at a fundamental operating frequency of 3.675 kHz”, whereas for the SDC 2300 "the transmit frequency is about 3 kHz")

With the gold price at a near all-time-ever record high (over AU$3,000 per Ounce in early September 2023) - you only need to find less than 3-ounces of gold to cover your investment cost of a new GPX 6000.